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Countdown Expression Art Exhibition Male Artists Profiles

We have started the count down to upcoming African Art Exhibition titled Expression. Hosted by Johfrim Art and Design and Hidden Lane Gallery, Glasgow, Scotland, UK.

Exhibition is opened to the public from Saturday, 11th January, 2020 to end of March 2020.

Venue – Hidden Lane Gallery, 1081 Argyle Street, Finnieston, Glasgow, G3 8LZ, Scotland, UK

Time – 11am to 5pm Daily (expect Sundays and Mondays Hidden Lane Gallery is closed).

We are not only showcasing a fantastic array of quality contemporary African Artworks by renowned artists and international guest artists but we are also celebrating these artists and their contributions to global and international creativity.

Enjoy your Art. It’s all about creativity!!!

We proudly present –

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Dr David Dale painter, Graphic artists, muralist, sculptor, print maker, stain glass maker and horticulturist. A multi-talent artist and excellent horticulturist and landscape designer was born in Lagos in 1947 to 2019 with a Scottish father and Nigerian mother parentage.
He taught at the Department of Architecture at the University of Lagos for thirteen years. He was also a Graphic Consultant for the African Architectural Technology Exhibition for FESTAC 77.
He has collectors international, private and institutionally), he has executed several prestigious commissions, and has participated in (solo and group) exhibitions.

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Abiodun Olaku is a professional artist – Painter
Professional Artist – Specialized in Painting· Widely, exhibited worldwide. Born in 29th Demcember,1958 in Lagos, Nigeria, Olaku is a member of the Society of Nigerian Artists (SNA) and he is a founding member, trustee and the current Vice-President of the Guild of Professional Fine Artists of Nigeria. Vice Chairman Universal Studios of Art, Lagos Nigeria.

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Dr Albert Ehi Akhogba, Ph.D.
was born and raised at Id. Eneman quarters, Ugboha in Esan South East Local Government Area, Esan Central Senatorial District, Edo State, Nigeria. He had his primary and post primary education at Ugboha from there he proceeded to Federal College of Education (FCE), Okene and received his Nigeria Certificate in Education (NCE) 1992 Fine Arts Double Major. He later got his Bachelor of Arts Education Degree Honours in Fine and Applied Arts (2000) and MFA Degree in Printmaking (2010) from University of Benin (UNIBEN). As a robust scholar, he got his Ph.D. (2018) in Art Education from University of Nigeria, Nsukka “the only University in Nigeria”.
Dr. A. E. Akhogba, fondly called “Magic Fingers” is Lecturer I, Graphic Design section currently Head of Department Visual Arts & Creative Design, Faculty of Environmental Studies, Ambrose Alli University, Ekpoma, Edo State. He has published researched articles in learned journals (Local and International), as well as several conferences, group art exhibitions, commissioned artworks in public places and private homes.

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Bunmi Babatunde, graduated with Higher Diploma in Sculpture from the Yaba College of Technology in 1983. He worked briefly at the Department of Culture where he produced the bust of the then Director of Culture, Dr Garba Asiwaju. He also has had various important commissions including the statue of MKO Abiola. He became a full time studio artist in 1984 and was party to the founding of the Universal Studios of Art of which he is the current Chairman, Executive Committee.
He has exhibited internationally, and his sculptures has made it to international auction houses such as Bonham.

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Hassan Aliyu, FRSA

Hassan Aliyu is a prominent Nigerian artist working in the UK. His visual art practice is informed by issues of race, equality, diaspora, and African identity within the context of contemporary and historical events. Having begun his career in Lagos at the onset of the Structural Adjustment Programme (SAP), a significant body of his work is created in a wide range of alternative, found and inexpensive materials. Deeply thought provoking, these collages respond to the geo-political and socio-economic upheavals that afflict Nigeria; not least the impacts of its civil war and the onslaught of Western and Eastern religions.
Born in the UK, his family relocated to Nigeria in his early childhood. Subsequently Hassan attended Ahmadu Bello University Zaria where he graduated as best Final Year Student in Fine Art in 1986. Following a brief and exciting artistic career in Lagos, Hassan returned to the UK in 1990. The incumbent president of the Nigeria Art Society UK (NASUK), Hassan works from his studios and private gallery in Rainham Essex. Among his recent projects include the NASUK Nigeria@100: Transforming a British Experiment exhibition at WAC Gallery Waterloo, London 2014; and the international touring exhibition, Legacies of Biafra, which originated at Brunei Gallery London in 2018.
A professional doctorate researcher at the University of East London, his research topic is African enslavement.

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Countdown Expression Art Exhibition Female Artists Profiles

 

We have started the count down to upcoming African Art Exhibition titled Expression. Hosted by Johfrim Art and Design and Hidden Lane Gallery, Glasgow, Scotland, UK.

Exhibition is opened to the public from Saturday, 11th January, 2020 to end of March 2020.

Venue – Hidden Lane Gallery, 1081 Argyle Street, Finnieston, Glasgow, G3 8LZ, Scotland, UK

Time – 11am to 5pm Daily (expect Sundays and Mondays Hidden Lane Gallery is closed).

We are not only showcasing a fantastic array of quality contemporary African Artworks by renowned artists and international guest artists but we are also celebrating these artists and their contributions to global and international creativity.

We have a powerful list of female artists exhibiting.

Enjoy your Art. It’s all about creativity!!!

We proudly present –

 

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Johfrim (Elder Chief Josephine Oboh-MacLeod)
Artist, Photographer, Designer at Johfrim Art & Design; Artistic Director of Phinessence.
She was born in Lagos, Nigeria, West Africa.
She enjoys painting, sculpting, photography & design. A lot of her inspiration comes from nature.
She studied at Newbury College, Boston, USA, and did her master’s degree at University of Surrey, Guildford, UK.
She studied Art at London Art College, UK; Interior/Garden Design at KLC School of Design, Chelsea Harbour, UK; and Photography at Calumet Photography and Jessop Academy, UK. She participated in various Art and Design apprentices’ programmes.
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Tinu Olabanji
Tinu is one of the few female Artists that was school mates of Abiodun Olaku and Bunmi Babatunde. She graduated with a painting degree from Yaba College of Technology in 1982. She is one of the few female resilient & avid painters. She can paint in various mediums, but she has a particular mastery in her water colour and acrylic artworks.
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Sekai Machache (b.1989) is based in Dundee, Scotland. Her work is a deep interrogation of the notion of self. Having been born in Zimbabwe and raised in Scotland, she has a particular interest in W.E.B Dubois’ notion of Double Consciousness, which expresses the psychological challenge of having African heritage whilst living in the West. Working in a multi-disciplinary practice, Sekai works with a wide range of media including but not exclusive to photography. Her photographic practice is mostly formulated through digital studio based compositions utilising body paint and muted lighting conditions, to create images that appear to emerge from darkness. Sekai is a founding and organising member of the Yon Afro Collective.
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Elizabeth Harrison
Elizabeth studied at University of Lagos, Nigeria where she now works. She loves painting especially with water colour. Her themes are sometimes traditional and there are deep cultural implications to her paintings. She has participated in several exhibitions.
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Nancy Barquero Gee is a Venezuelan artist residing in Great Britain, focusing on sculpting and painting. she predominantly paints photorealism and impressionist subjects produced onsite or from photographs, with most of the photographs taken by herself.
She studied at the sculpture school “Taller Arte Fuego” in Caracas, Venezuela where she trained in bronze, resin and clay modelling techniques. She further continued her art education and obtained a DipHE in Creative Arts granted by the University for the Creative Arts in England.
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Lara Catherine Boglo is fine artist, a painter and interior designer. She graduated from the university of Benin, in Nigeria, majoring in Painting. She hails from Lagos Nigeria.
Her main media of expression in her paintings include, oil, Acrylic on canvas and mixed media.
And she draws inspirations from various subject matters of interest to her like the environment, religion, politics and changing social cultural trends in society.

 

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Natalie Priddy was born in 1986. She is a painter & photographer of great skills. She is of African and American parentage. She studied Art at The American Academy of Art in Chicago, USA.
After completing high school in Ireland, she decided to further her understanding of Art, especially Visual Art, at The American Academy of Art in Chicago, USA. Studying traditional methods strengthened her perception and knowledge.

 

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Adebusola Ramsay
Born 1983 in Lagos, Nigeria, lives and works in Glasgow, Scotland. An abstract artist, whose practice has developed over the last 20 years. Her art takes form in painting and printmaking, working mostly with acrylics and features evocative colour contrast and textural detail. She explores different forms of mark-making using brushes, sawn wood and scrapers to create new perspectives in irregular line and colour patterns.
she worked with a PhD candidate in History, as a co-lead for Black History Month walking tour highlighting the historical links between Glasgow’s built heritage and Transatlantic Slave Trade, racialised chattel slavery, colonisation and empire.
EDUCATION: Bsc (Hons) Biomedical Sciences, University of Glasgow (2004)

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Chief Nike Okundaye is a textile artist and a painter at Nike Art Center, Lekki, Lagos, Nigeria. Founder /CEO Nike Art Gallery Ltd & Nike art foundation.
She is a multi-talented Artist and paints in different mediums. She is a very good fabric designer amongst her numerous talents. She is also renowned for her home furnishing line especially her hand dyed and hand sewed quilts. She has numerous traditional titles and also from Ikate Land, Lekki, Lagos, Nigeria.
She has a renowned in Lekki, Lagos, and other parts of Nigeria. World famous Nigerian foremost female Artist and culture advocate. She has exhibited internationally and has worldwide collectors including diplomats and presidents of various countries including United States of America.
She has done and continue to do a lot for Charity and humanity.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Events & Upcoming Events

Excellent Art Exhibition coming up in January 2020 at Hidden Lane Gallery. A collaboration between Hidden Lane Gallery and Johfrim Art and Design.

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Josephine
Chief Josephine Oboh-Macleod (Johfrim) (Artist, Designer, Culture Advocate)
EXPRESSION Contemporary African Art in Perspective
JANUARY – MARCH 2020
Johfrim Art and Design has a global view of creativity – a universal approach to reaching out and enhancing lives internationally through the promotion of art and culture. We also support the use of art in the holistic well-being of an individual and this is showcased in the activities of our affiliate charity JOM Charity (SCIO) SC048839. (JOM CHARITY.COM)
We are here to celebrate art, particularly African Art, as a contributor to world unity, economy, culture and humanity. Humankind is known to have its earliest origin in Africa. Africans have since excelled in various art forms. African art is known to have inspired international artists such as Modigliani, Picasso, Giacometti, Matisse, the Paris movement and many more; to this day African art remains intriguing, exotic and powerful.
Africa is blessed to have art as a vital force that positively enhances its image and adds to her GDP. African artists were well respected in their communities and most had other occupations but evoke happiness and other emotions to their communities through their art. Art uses were varied, from celebration of birth, life, death, religion, decoration, royal recording, documentation of important occasions etc.
Celebrating African Art

Chief Josephine Oboh-Macleod (Johfrim) (Artist, Designer, Culture Advocate) Johfrim Art and Design (Kakofoni Group) proudly presents in collaboration with Hidden Lane Gallery,EXPRESSION – Contemporary African Art in Perspective

A lot of African artists get their inspiration from events around them, nature and the environment. African artists have an acute sense of rhythm and movement this is encompassed in the depiction of their forms and this rhythm and movement can also be seen in African music and dance. Art in Africa is mainly done by hand, a laborious process but artists showcase their craftmanship with zeal, dedication and affection. Colours are very important. They are used to express mood. Either their mood or the mood they intend for the viewer. African sculpture has dynamic life force that no doubt impresses upon the on looker. Sculptors successfully link planes, cubes, forms, proportions, scale, elevations and depression to produce a pleasing holistic piece. They sometimes combine realism with abstraction to create a free-spirited piece of artwork. “Beauty is in the eye of the beholder”. Some ignorant, will say African art is naïve, primitive and ugly but one must realise that African art was produced by the artist for various reasons. If it is to be used for a traditional ceremony that needs the character to be fearsome, so the artist will depict such in his rendering. If these artworks are still being perceived as fearsome today then the intention of the artist has been achieved even after several generations.
African art was used for ceremonial/religious purposes. As a deterrent/praise/respect in the case of the ancestors, for decoration, by royalty to showcase their importance or record events, but most especially for the enjoyment of the artist and community. Researchers have since countered the myth that African art of old was done by immigrants, but real African art was done by native Africans. They might have been influenced by foreign elements at some point, but they used what was compatible with their conception and inspiration from their environment and the world around them to be creative. They sometimes used their body as a living canvas in the way they tattooed their bodies, adorned their clothes and jewelleries. They believed that the gift of art came from Almighty God. Art is pleasing to most humans, Africa is no different.
We at Johfrim Art & Design are here to showcase modern-day African artists whose ancestors produced masterpieces on show in museums and important collections around the world.
Like their forefathers they are mostly influenced by nature, communities, spirituality, and life around them. The world is more global, but our African artists are telling their stories through their art. Their contribution is countering some of the accepted negative impressions of Africa.
African art is something to uphold and support. Please come, look at our artwork. What does it evoke in you? Explore!!! It’s all about creativity and the Arts. Enjoy your Art!
We thank all contributors, Joe Mulholland and Carole Dunlop at Hidden Lane Gallery, all of our exhibiting artists, Johfrim Art and design team, and most especially our audience.
For this writeup we acknowledge with gratitude books including; ‘African Art’ by Frank Willet, ‘Nigerian Images’ by William Fagg/Herbert List, ‘The Art of Africa’ by Elsy Leuzinger, ‘Art Through the Ages’ by Gardner, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, USA, the Internet, other resources & Professor Chris Dunton for his edit, support, and comments.
Elder Chief Josephine Oboh-Macleod Edion & Adonor of Emu Kingdom, Ishan, Edo State, Nigeria Atayese of Ikateland, Elegushi, Lekki, Lagos, Nigeria.
© Josephine Oboh-Macleod (Johfrim) johfrimartanddesign.com johfrimartanddesign@gmail.com
Olojo Kosoko Kolawole
Kolawole K. Olojo-Kosoko Artist & Lecturer Vice Chairman Society of Nigerian Artist Lagos Chapter Department of Art and Industrial Design, Lagos State Polytechnic, Ikorodu, Lagos. Nigeria
Among the earliest surviving examples of African Art are images of animals painted on rock slabs found in caves in Namibia, animal images which were painted on rock in the Sahara, dated from 6000 to 4000 BC. The earliest known African sculpture, dated from 500BC to AD 200, are clay heads and human figures from Central Nigeria. Many more surviving examples of African art are dated from the 14th to the 17th century.
The error of generalizing functions and meanings of African Art tends to mislead because, indigenous African Art does not emanate from any single tradition. This is due to the fact that Africa is a heterogeneous continent with hundreds of cultures that have their own languages, religious beliefs, political systems and ways of doing things. Each culture produces its own distinctive art forms with variety in material, intentions, functions and results.
African art is a part of our people’s way of life, which is noticeable in the day-today activities of the people. Robert Brain in 1980, saw traditional African Art forms as classical objects whose origin and context are lost in the past. The history of African Art and its documentary is shrouded in antiquity and has its origins in the mists of the early history of the human race, beginning as early as 25,000 BC and continuing to the present.
Kolawole K. Olojo-Kosoko Artist & Lecturer Vice Chairman Society of Nigerian Artist Lagos Chapter Department of Art and Industrial Design, Lagos State Polytechnic, Ikorodu, Lagos. Nigeria.
Joe Mulholland Hidden Lane Gallery
This exhibition is the fourth excursion by the Hidden Lane Gallery into the fascinating field of African Art. The previous three were almost random collections of objects from the continent which had made their way to Europe, mainly Scotland and France, in the kit bags of soldiers, in the luggage of colonial administrators, and, latterly, in the baggage of tourists. Most, however, were from earlier times with, in the main, an obscure provenance or details of how they were acquired. Possibly we are better off not knowing of the shameful acts which surrounded their finding.
None, we hope, as horrifying as the massacre of those citizens of Benin who had the misfortune to be in the palace of the king when a band of mercenaries was enlisted by a British administrator in response to an imagined insult. The palace, on three levels, was destroyed and the bronzes which adorned its facade were taken to be sold in Paris to pay for the expedition, The remainder still shamefully cry out to be returned to Africa from the walls of the British Museum in London.
At least the solid gold Royal Throne of the Ashanti Kingdom which sixteen or so members of the court were tortured to death by British officials for refusing to divulge its whereabouts, remained hidden, to be discovered buried in a ditch half acentury ago. It is now in its rightful place in the National Museum there.
Happier times are here now, with a show of contemporary African Art brought to us by Josephine ObohMacleod, a chief in her own right (I hesitate to use the word tribe, which has acquired an element of racialism in recent times in my opinion.)
Dr. Albert Ehi Akhogba. Ph.D, GSC, VPAN. Doctor of Fine and Applied Arts/Art Education Ambrose Alli University, Ekpoma, Edo State, Nigeria.
African Art applies to all the indigenous groups in the African continent from Egypt in the North to South Africa in the South. It encompases sculpture, painting, installations and costume expressing the richness and diversity of the many hundreds of distinct ethnic groups. Within Africa these manifestations of local culture became popular, and spread to Europe, the United States of America and elsewhere when the richness of African artistic acheivements started to become known. This is particularly true of the wonderfully diverse creations in Nigeria (Benin art, Nok art, Ife art and Igbo Ukwu art), the Benin Republic (Fon art), Burkina Faso (Mossi and Bobo), Mali (Dogon and Bambara), Egypt etc. Every indigenous group in Africa developed its own style of Art. Between neighbouring countries there is always an element of the ideas eminating from related ethnic backgrounds.
African Art has may elements and priciples not necessarily obvious to the European observer. Sometimes the work can be naturalistic and realistic, but more often the figures created are not adhering to the scientific study of the human anatomy. Each tribe developed over the centuries an often very different interpretation in whichthe natural shape and proportions of the human body are modified or accentuated. The simplified, distorted and endless variety of styles sometimes develop into what are often looked on as immediately unrecognizable abstract forms . The head, abdomen, breasts and thighs are often exaggerated while the limbs are sometimes protruding unecessarily. The eyes stick out like tubes and the nose may be reduced to a narrow ridge. The mouth may be in form of a circle, oval, rectangle or even entirely omitted.
No two African art forms are the same, but it follows that African art as a whole exhibits a fascinating richness of invention when dealing with the human figure. The priciple purpose of African traditional art forms is for socio-economic, religious affinity and visual communication., drawing on the history of the family or tribe and have a greater imprtance within African communities than in the Western world where links with ones ancestory and art have often been completely lost. They also serve the purpose of aesthetic satisfaction, achievements, privileges, education and prestige. The artistic elements and principles inherent in them with their styles, philosophy/ideology, symbols, medium, techniques of rendition and contexts allow the serious student of the culture of Africa to delve into the history and beliefs of cultures which are as rich as any other culture in any part of the World.
AFRICAN ART: CHARACTERISTICS AND PURPOSE By Dr. Albert Ehi Akhogba. Ph.D, GSC, VPAN. Doctor of Fine and Applied Arts/Art Education Ambrose Alli University, Ekpoma, Edo State, Nigeria.
One of the main questions encountered in our study of African Art is the question of whether African traditional art forms are qualified for artistic discourse/exhibition. This doubting attitude has usually been premised on various criticisms including the argument that African traditional art forms are primitive partly because the traditional artist did not have to explain the meanings behind his or her creations.
Those of you who have seen the previous shows at the Gallery will recognise some of the artistic ideas which have inspired the creation of many of the exhibits on display, and acknowledge that the individual talents which created these objects are a living reminder of the power of art. Its universality and, just as important the differences that are brought into play in all creative processes help to express the individuality of each ethnic group throughout the world, and also those aspects of their heritage which make us all different, and interesting.
Alan Dedman
Alan Dedman Artist and lecturer at London Art College

Primitivism

Seeking a more authentic engagement between Art and life Paul Gauguin travelled to Polynesia but was criticised for bringing his own ‘romantic outlook’ to bear. The German painter Max Beckman decried “this dependence on ancient primitive styles”. He found it “weak because Gauguin and the like weren’t able to create types out of their own confused and fragmented times which could serve us in the way that the gods and heroes served the peoples of old.”
From ‘Primitivism and Modernity: An Expressionist Dilemma’ by Jill Lloyd Painters in Germany sought to revitalize society by embroiling themselves in the culture, practices and imagery of primitive peoples around the World. At one point ‘the primitive was defined in antithesis to the norm of Western realism’. Emil Nolde, the German/Danish painter, said of German expressionism: ” The natives create with the actual material in their hands ….. our age has seen to it that a design on paper has to precede every clay pot, ornament, useful object or piece of clothing”. In 1912 Franz Marc (another German artist) wrote: “our ideas and ideals must be clad in hairshirts, they must be fed on locusts and wild honey, not on history, if we are ever to escape the exhaustion of our European bad taste”.

Colonialism and the slave trade

But at what price do we escape the exhaustion of European bad taste? What were the consequences for the peoples and societies from which inspiration was being drawn? Nolde wrote: “Colonization is a brutal matter. If a history of colonialism could be written from the point of view of the natives we white Europeans would crawl off to hide ….. Perhaps it is possible to comfort ourselves with ideas about survival of the fittest ….. if it is possible to draw comfort from such a law to justify the actions of the Europeans here ….. One thing is for sure. White men are the enemies of coloured native people”. Times have changed; such a drastic outlook is ameliorated by social progress and development around the World. Nolde is a controversial figure amongst German painters, but at least he shows awareness and sensitivity regarding colonial history. Colonialism and the slave trade brought African imagery into Europe and beyond. We can appreciate through music how African rhythms, melodies and (musical) figures of speech found their way to the Americas through the transatlantic slave trade. Jazz, Rock and Roll, Soul, Hip-Hop etc., all evolved from there, ricocheting back to ‘the Old World’.
European assimilation of African Art

Rather than seeing the assimilation of African culture (by advanced economies) entirely as cultural appropriation, it is better if we think about it as a hybrid development. However, critical awareness is necessary when we consider the way in which ‘the stars’ often reap more than their fair share of glory by making African modes of expression popular. Dudu Pukwana was playing in London well before Paul Simon published ‘Graceland’. Both aspects of musical output share South African heritage, yet we all know the latter more than the former.
During the last century, big names of the Western Art World became inspired by African Art in their search for more valid means of expression. Rapid industrialisation occurred across Europe during the 18th, 19th and the first half of the 20th Century. This had the effect of making people feel displaced and alienated. The remedy (so artists would have it) was to be found in more authentic modes of existence – amongst ‘less civilised’ communities. At the time when this began to take place, France was a recently formed Republic. The French Revolution had it’s philosophical and political roots in the thinking of Jean Jacques Rousseau.
Rousseau’s ideas gave rise to ‘The Social Contract’ upon which Robespierre based revolutionary practice, including ‘the Terror’. Rousseau is also associated with the notion of ‘the Noble Savage’. This concept became emblematic of the European obsession with ‘Primitivism’.
Exploring Contemporary African Art Through The Ages
Likewise, the stars of the Art World laid claim to Africa’s imagery, making it apparent in our everyday lives. Picasso, Matisse, Braque, Derain, Kirchner, Modigliani et al – all owe a debt to the artistic fabric of ‘the dark continent’. Picasso first saw a figurine made by the Vili people of the Congo, (owned by Matisse) in 1906. African Art helped Picasso with the concept of abstraction. His use of concavity in place of the convex, serrated marks, ‘transparent’ planes etc, all stem from his obsession with tribal Art. His visit to the Trocadero museum in 1907 was to influence his painting known as ‘Les Demoiselles d’Avignon’. Much of the form in this painting is developed from Bakota sculpture and masks of the Dan people from the Ivory Coast.
‘Picasso stole the work of African artists’Contrary to the legendary status accorded him, Picasso can also be seen as a ruthless egotist scrambling for success. His ‘urge’ to paint Les Demoiselles is as much to do with blowing Matisse out of the water and asserting his own ‘genius’ as anything else. Did he care about the African sources he used? In 2006 at the ‘Picasso and Africa Exhibition’ in Johannesburg, a spokesman for the South African Department of Arts and Culture, Sandile Memela said: “Today the truth is on display that Picasso would not have been the renowned creative genius he was if he did not steal and re-adapt the work of ‘anonymous [African] artists’. There seems to be some clandestine agenda… that projects Picasso as someone… who loved African art so much that he went out of his way to reveal it to the world… But all this is a whitewash… he is but one of the many products of African inspiration and creativity who lacked the courage to admit its influence on his consciousness and creativity.” From: Picasso ‘stole the work of African artists’ by Stephen Bevan The faces in Les Demoiselles d’ Avignon each bear a similar expression. Picasso’s whores have empty, mawkish eyes – a regular characteristic of his portraiture, as if it were his own vacant consciousness beseeching us to regard him. The soul-less gaze of these women has more to do with demanding the viewer’s attention, than invoking and respecting the magical power of the African Art upon which they are based – or portraying the psyches of sex workers. Picasso fans would argue otherwise – but it is alleged he once said: “African Art? Never heard of it!’”
The Art Market
A colleague of mine opined: ‘the Fine Art World (in the West), is the icing on the cake of Capitalism’. Whether you accept this or not, it is important to question why it might be so. Participation in the Fine Art market tends to be the preserve of wealthy elites, whose appreciation of Art is facilitated by financial muscle. Art objects as they are purveyed through the international system of galleries and auction houses become fetishes, symbols for the superrich and are treated as investments, similar to stocks and shares. Artists have always courted the patronage and matronage of Art connoisseurs. Artists want to be paid well – but like diamonds, there are too many Artists. It’s an issue of supply and demand. So ‘the system’ requires that only a few ‘make it’. Thus absurd monetary value can be placed on their output, preserving the status quo. Anyone can create meaningful or powerful marks but it’s the marketing process which transforms them into ‘Art’. Like jewellery in a shopping mall or water in a desert, if such things are in short supply – of course they will be valuable.
Contemporary developments in Afro-Caribbean Art
Across the pond, we can cite Jean Michel Basqiat as an example of Afro-American success in the Fine Arts. From a disturbed family background, this former graffiti artist in New York made it big, his works command hundreds of millions of dollars in price. Typically, he is no longer with us, dying from a heroin overdose in 1988. A life-span and style befitting the mythology of artistic prominence asserted by ‘the system’. He isn’t around to enjoy the benefits of his success, but the cognoscenti are. Artistic achievement shouldn’t only be measured by/with money. A feature of the South London streets during the 1990s was ‘the White Lady of Camberwell’. Unlike celebs who use costume or cross-dressing to gain attention, this Afro-Caribbean personality cut a startlingly subversive figure against the tumult of one of the UK’s poorest and most ethnically mixed boroughs. Art historians would probably categorize her under ‘Outsider Art’, because she didn’t do it for fame or profit – just to satisfy her own creative expression. With the forgoing in mind, look to the rich variety and vitality of work on display here at Hidden Lane Gallery in Glasgow. Appreciate the heritage of African people, Africa and it’s Art – in a contemporary context. Be thankful for it and dare to invest beyond the pale.
Alan Dedman Artist and lecturer at London Art College
© Published by Johfrim & Joe Mulholland at the Hidden Lane Gallery 2020 Designed by Carole Dunlop – weebrowndoggy.com Hidden Lane Gallery 1081 Argyle Street, Glasgow G12 8LZ
Open 1100 – 1700 Tuesday to Saturday gallery@hiddenlanegallery.com www.hiddenlanegallery.com
Johfrim Art & Design affiliate of Kakofoni Ltd (Nigeria & UK) Art Collections, Sculptures, Textiles, Jewellery, Interior and Landscape Design & Architectural Design Services
J.O.M Charity Arts . Culture . Fairtrade . Education . Heritage . Science. Human Rights . Environment
26A Station Road, Milngavie, Glasgow, G62 8AB, Scotland, United Kingdom Mobile: +44 7900 396707 email: jomcharity@aol.com www.jomcharity.com Lara Catherine Bogle Metropolitan Eyo

Lambhill Stable in conjunction with Johfrim Art and Design & TAAC 

Presents an Art exhibition titled Crescendo as part of the celebration to commemorate Lambhill stable open day & Black history month.

Venue –Lambhill Stable. 

11 Canal Bank North, Glasgow, G22 6RD

Date – 21th Sept, 2018 to 30th October, 2018.

Time – Weekdays – 11am to 4pm 

Saturdays   –  11am to 3pm 

               Sundays – Closed

Admission Free

Refreshment to be provided  Lambhill cafe at a reasonable price

 

Art room at Lambhill Stables.

  

Photos from the Crescendo Exhibition.

A big thank you to the hardworking team that put put the Artworks for Crescendo Exhibition.

                  

Mystery African Talking Stick, found at Lambhill Stable foundation during renovations. It inspired this exhibition. We are still not sure of what part of Africa it came from; if you have any idea please give us your opinion.

 

Johfrim Art and Design

Presents Exhibition titled Nigeria, The Giant of Africa  to commemorate Nigerian Independence day.

Venue – Lambhill Stable.

11 Canal Bank North, Glasgow, G22 6RD

Date – Monday, 1st Oct, 2018.

Time – 11am – 4pm

Admission Free

Refreshment to be provided at Lambhill cafe at a reasonable price.

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Proverbs, Sayings, Symbols and Storytelling

AFRICAN PROVERBS

Proverbs, sayings, symbols and storytelling influenced the African people and their communities therefore affected the Artists living within these communities.

Painting by Chief Nike Davies-Okundaye of Nike Art Center, Lagos, Nigeria.

http://www.nikeart.com/

Proverbs can be described as traditional saying in common use, well known wise saying, byword, and adage.

Proverbs was and is still in common use in Africa. The were used to give discussions and communications directive. They gave in depth meaning to words.  Also, during decision making they can be used to give authority and encouragement.

There are similarities in proverbs across the African continent and some are not dissimilar to wise say around the world.

 

When a lizard falls from great heights it nods its head to praise itself (Nigeria)

 (It can be interpreted to mean, praise yourself for your good deed).

When an old man reaches the zenith of his height a young man grows to meet him.

He who wants to fly must first learn to stand. (Nigeria)

Tolerance cannot be considered a weakness. (Ethiopia)

An antelope does not wear the shoes of an elephant. (Ghana)

One finger alone cannot carry a load. (Sierra-Leone)

A person who uses a sieve to collect rainwater is deceiving himself. (Nigeria)

It is he who begs for something that has the longer hand. (Nigeria)

If you do not cry out, you will die unheard. (Swaziland)

We want to share our collection with you and update them regularly. Please send us some proverbs to share. They do not have to be only African, but we will appreciate if you can tell us which country it is from if you have the information and suggested interpretation.

 Write up by Edion (Elder) Chief Mrs Josephine Oboh-Macleod

The Adonor of Emu Kingdom, Ishan, Edo State, Nigeria.

The Atayese of Ikateland, Elegusi, Lekki, Lagos State, Nigeria.

Edion of Akhiophen, Emu Kingdom, Ishan, Edo State, Nigeria.

My husband and are with the wise oldest man in Josephine’s clan at the time. Late Odion Egbe of Akhiophen, Emu Kingdom, Ishan, Edo State, Nigeria.

Edion (refereed according to clan language) or Elder is one of the highest honour bestowed by a clan in most of Africa and the Oldest clan member is the head of the Elders.

 Artwork by Donald Ekpo (Johfrim Art & Design collection)
Photography of Johfrim by Trevor Graham Photography, Milngavie, Glasgow, Scotland.
Posted on

Charity Footsteps

Ethnobotanical Garden

Yorubaland is home to the Yoruba, the largest ethnic group in southwest Nigeria. Use of indigenous plants for health and healing has been passed down from generation to generation of Yoruba. This ancient system is known as Ifa, the path of divination, and a practitioner is called babaláwo, father of ancient wisdom. Yoruba beliefs and culture are no longer confined to Yorubaland. Over 200 years ago, people from this region of West Africa were taken as slaves to the New World. Enduring untold hardships, they retained their physical strength and indomitable spirit through these traditional practices and incantations. In the Caribbean they gave rise to Santería, a new belief system that spread to the United States. Medicinal plants are still at the heart of these beliefs, preserving something of the West African rainforest in the urban jungle of American cities.

The Ethnobotanical Garden is beside the Botanical Nursery. It aims to:

  • cultivate, propagate, and display plants of practical and cultural importance to the Yoruba
  • increase awareness of native plants, their uses and conservation
  • provide materials and information for training, education and research
  • organise guided walks and hire of the garden for enjoyment of Yoruba plant heritage

The Ethnobotanical Garden was developed by the IITA Forest Project, funded by the Leventis Foundation 2010-2014. Further support was received in 2012 from Ibadan International School, which donated proceeds of a sponsored “mathbuster” challenge, and from the Kakofoni Arts Foundation which held a fund-raising “Reforestation Ball” at the Muson Centre, Lagos. The event was organised by Elder Chief (Mrs) Josephine Oboh-Macleod with support from Chief Norman Core MacLeod, media environmentalist Mr Desmond Majekodunmi, interior designer Mrs Zusi Ward, and fashion designer Mrs Osuare Egbuonu. Mr Festus Olumese was also a donor at this event.

 

Picture of Ethnobotanical GardenPicture of Guinea pepper, Ata-ire Aframomum melagueta
Ethnobotanical Garden

Our address

IITA Headquarters
PMB 5320, Oyo Road, Ibadan 200001, Oyo State, Nigeria.

 

            Johfrim Art & Design

Charity Auction Titled – ‘Metamorphosis’

Took Place at

Akorita (Spirit of Motherhood) Charity ball, Sprowston Manor Marriot Hotel & Country Club, Norwich, United Kingdom on 11th November, 2017.

 

This was a successful event that raised money for breast cancer. 

Painting – Sisi Eko by Mba.

Johfrim Art & Design supported the event by donation several Artworks and other items for auction. The proceed was given to Akorita charity. They included this painting and sculpture.

Sculpture – African Venus de Milo by Abdul Haliru

Milngavie Week Photography Competition.

Our creative director Johfrim (Josephine Oboh-Macleod) was honoured to be a judge a Milngavie week photography exhibition. Over 80 beautiful photographs.

The winning 2018 photographs are currently on display at Garvins Mill Gallery.

Garvin’s Mill, Milngavie, Glasgow. https://www.gavinsmill.org/

https://www.facebook.com/milngavieweek/

 

https://www.kirkintilloch-herald.co.uk/news/new-photo-contest-for-milngavie-week-1-4132816

Assist with Art Therapy Abbotford Suites care home, Milngavie, 

Glasgow Scotland, United Kingdom.

& Antoine House  Care Home, Bearsden, Glasgow Scotland, United Kingdom.

 

 

 

 

 Chief Josephine in Art Therapy room Abbortford Suites Care home.       The Opening of Abbortford Suites Care home Chief Josephine with manager Sue of Abbortford at the Art Therapy room.    In the garden of Antonine House with Dr John Donald MacLeod who will mark his 100th birthday this year 2018. He is one of  Chief Josephine’s Art therapy participants. 

 

 

Assists with Gardening at Baldernock Childcare Garden, Balmore & Glasgow Academy, Milngavie, Glasgow Scotland.

 

 

Ghana Independence  Day on 6th March, 2018 at TAAC, Chief Josephine Oboh -Macleod spearheaded this celebration with TAAC Chief Kofi Amu.

TAAC. http://www.voicetaactv.net/

Chief Josephine Oboh-Macleod is an active volunteer at Gavin’s Mill, Milngavie, Glasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom.

Gavins Mill is one of Glasgow’s leading fair trade shop apart from being a volunteer she is the in house  photographer and she has donated substantial works to the Mill and did their product photography. She is currently planing Art therapy classes to take place at Gavins Mill in the near future.

https://www.gavinsmill.org/

Photography by Johfrim, Josephine Oboh-Macleod

Nelson Mandela Centenary Gala Dinner.  

Venue – The Hilton Hotel Glasgow,

1 William St,

Glasgow G3 8HT

on Friday 24 August, 2018

The monies raised is to go primarily towards erecting a statue of Nelson Mandela at Mandela place in Glasgow, city center.

This is a very worthy cause to immortalise the work of Nelson Mandela and others like him.

Johfrim donated her painting title African Queen which went on a silent auction.

   

If you want to join in the campaign to carry forward the legacy of Nelson Mandela please contact the foundation.

https://mandelascottishmemorial.org/

I am very happy to share with you that over £25,000 (Twenty Five Thousand Pounds) was raised on

Nelson Mandela Centenary Gala Dinner. My painting African Queen which went on a silent auction was bought and all of the proceeds was donated by Chief Josephine Oboh-MacLeod Johfrim to Nelson Mandela Scottish Memorial Foundation.

More donations are still being received please do not hesitate to donate to this good cause.

Chief Josephine Oboh-Macleod (Johfrim) is current in collaboration with Lambhill Stables, Hosting an African Art inspired Exhibition titled Crescendo that will last till the 21st September till end of October 2018. This exhibition as been very successful. All proceeds of craft and CD sales goes to Lambhill Stable Community Centre. We intend to have a continued relationship with Lambhill Stable Community Centreto do Art and Craft workshops and Gardening workshops.

 

 

 

 

Posted on

CELEBRATING AFRICAN ART etc

Johfrim Art & Design proudly presents to our esteemed audience our blog

CELEBRATING AFRICAN ART

Humankind is known to have its earliest origin in Africa. Africans have since excelled in various art forms. African art is known to have inspired international artists such as Modigliani, Picasso, Giacometti and many more;  to this day African art remains intriguing, powerful, and full of energy.

walkingman sculpture

Picasso

Sculpture Amedeo-Modigliani-tete-de-jeune-fille-a-la-frange

Africa is blessed to have art as a vital force that positively enhances its image and adding to her GDP.

The African artist were well respected in their communities and most had other occupation but evoke happiness and other emotions to their communities through their art.

Art uses were varied, from celebration of birth, life, death, religion, decoration, royal recording, documentation of important occasions etc.

A lot of African artist get their inspiration from events around them, nature and the environment.

African artist has an acute sense of rhythm and movement this is encompass in the depiction of their forms and this rhythm and movement can also be seen in the African music and dance.

Art in Africa is mainly done by hand, a laborious process but the artist showcases his craftmanship with zeal, dedication and affection.

Colours are very important. They are used to express mood. Either their mood or the mood they intend for the viewer. African sculpture has dynamic life force that no doubt impresses upon the on looker.

                                   

Their sculptors successfully link planes, cubes, forms, elevations and depression to produce a pleasing holistic piece. They sometime combine realism with abstraction to create a free-spirited piece of artwork.

“Beauty is in the eye of the beholder”. Some ignorant, will say African art is naïve, primitive and ugly but one must realise that African art was produced by the artist for various reasons. If it is to be used to a traditional ceremony that needs the character to be fearsome, so the artist will depict such in his rendering.

African art as earlier stated was used for ceremonial/religious purpose. As a deterrent/praise /respect in the case of the ancestors, for decoration, by royalty to showcase their importance or record events, but most especially for the enjoyment of the artist and community.

Researchers have since countered the myth that African art of old were done by immigrants, but real African art were done by native African. They might have been influenced by foreign elements at some point, but they used what was compatible with their conception and inspiration to be creative. They believed that the gift of art came from Almighty God. Art is a pleasing factor to most human, so Africa is not any different.

                                                            

We at Johfrim Art & Design are here to showcase that the modern-day African artists are with the ancestry of those that have produced master pieces that are at various museums and important collection around the world.

Like their forefathers they are mostly influence by nature, communities, spirituality, and life they experience or around them. We must expect influence of the international communities. The world is more global, but our African artist are telling their stories through art. Their contribution is countering some of the blanket negative impression of Africa.

                                                                 

African art is something to uphold and support. Please look at an image of a African artwork and send us your opinion of what it evokes in you in a few words to share.

We are pleased that some auction houses such as Bonhams now actively promote the sale of African art.

https://www.bonhams.com/auctions/24246/

Explore!!!

It’s all about creativity and the Arts.

Enjoy your Art!

We thank all contributors, including books, African Art by Frank Willet, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, USA, The Art of Africa by Elsy Leuzinger , The internet & professor Chris Dunton for his Edit and support.

Photography of Johfrim by Trevor Graham Photography, Milngavie, Glasgow, Scotland.

 

Johfrim Art & Design, creative director Johfrim (Josephine Oboh-Macleod) attended a fundraising event organised by Nelson Mandela Scottish Memorial Foundation.

Nelson Mandela Centenary Gala Dinner.  

Venue – The Hilton Hotel Glasgow,

1 William St,

Glasgow G3 8HT

on Friday 24 August, 2018

The monies raised is to go primarily towards erecting a statue of Nelson Mandela at Mandela place in Glasgow, city center.

This is a very worthy cause to immortalise the work of Nelson Mandela and others like him.

Johfrim donated her painting titled African Queen which went on a silent auction.

Johfrim with Dougie Harrison, RT Hon Lord George Robertson of Port Ellen.(A keen photographer and author of photography book showcasing the beautiful Isles of Islay and Jura), John Nelson and his wife of Nelson Mandela Scottish Memorial Foundation.

https://www.amazon.com/Islay-Jura-George-Robertson/dp/1841584282

The gala event was a fun and it was a successful fundraising evening. Johfrim also got a complimentary copy of much liked Sogo magazine. (Art+Literature+Music+Photography+Design).

https://www.sogomagazine.com/

https://www.facebook.com/sogomag/

This is a worthy cause. If you want to support, please contact

Nelson Mandela Scottish Memorial Foundation.

https://mandelascottishmemorial.org/

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